Tag Archives: Suicide

Texas boy, 12, hangs himself after battling depression amid COVID-19, by Yaron Steinbuch

They should keep a statistic for tragic deaths like this one—not caused by Covid-19 but by the response to Covid-19. From Yaron Steinbuch at nypost.com:

A 12-year-old Texas boy who felt “sad and lonely” amid the coronavirus lockdown measures hanged himself, his father revealed in a report about the tragedy.

Hayden Hunstable, of Aledo, took his own life three days before his 13th birthday in April 2020 because he didn’t know how to deal with the isolation and depression when the emerging disease caused a nationwide shutdown, the UK’s Metro reported.

The boy’s 9-year-old sister, Kinlee, found him hanged in his bedroom, according to the outlet.

Hayden’s heartbroken dad, Brad, 42, spoke to Metro to help prevent future suicides among the nation’s youth.

“COVID killed my son. I think Hayden would still be alive today if COVID had never happened,” the father of three told the outlet. “I had no idea he was struggling or depressed — he was such a happy kid and loved his friends and family.”

Calling the pandemic a “perfect storm for suicide and depression,” Brad said: “I think everything just got on top of him, he felt overwhelmed and he made a tragic decision.”

On April 17, he recounted, the water went out in the family’s home and Brad’s father came over and Hayden helped them fix the problem.

Continue reading→

Another Whistleblower Suicide: The Immediate and Unquestioned State Narrative of Philip Haney’s Death, by Gary D. Barnett

How many people commit suicide by shooting themselves in the chest? Granted, suicidal people often aren’t thinking very clearly, but why would you do it in a way that doesn’t usually kill you instantly and inflicts a lot of pain before death? From Gary D. Barnett at lewrockwell.com:

A shocking crime was committed on the unscrupulous initiative of few individuals, with the blessing of more, and amid the passive acquiescence of all.

~ Cornelius Tacitus (1964). “The histories”

It seems due to the brainwashing of the American commoner, and the almost total indoctrination machine of the state that is used to dumb down the populace at large, that apathy has become so rampant as to allow the general acceptance of fallacious state narratives. These narratives that concern the very suspicious deaths of any that challenge the ruling class or their political puppets, and almost without question, seem to be never-ending these days. There are an unbelievable number of victims of so-called “apparent suicides,” assassinations, outright murder, disappearance, strange car crashes, poisonings, and any other number of unlikely death scenarios of those that have damning information about the state, its wars, and its secrets, and have the guts to tell the truth. Coincidence is no longer a reasonable argument concerning these deaths, and actually never has been legitimate.

This tragedy of mass acceptance of lies is based on a monstrous propaganda machine that has attained a level of false credibility that belies the imagination of any with the ability to think. In order to gain this advantage over the bulk of society, the state has spared no amount of money, power, or manipulation in order to be able to commit heinous crimes without fear of exposure. This requires not only the complicity of the state apparatus, but also the almost total control of all mainstream media as well. This could never have been achieved without the mind control efforts of the compulsory government schooling system, its monopoly over the children of this country, and its use of false curriculum meant to corrupt the population from an early age, breeding state worship, nationalism, and a belief in herd mentality.

Continue reading

Suicide and Murder — Side Effects of Medication, by Joseph Mercola

There is very little discussion, much less than there ought to be, about the downsides of psychiatric drugs. From Joseph Mercola at lewrockwell.com:

According to a 2017 study,1 1 in 6 Americans between the ages of 18 and 85 were on psychiatric drugs in 2013, most of them antidepressants. Of them, 84.3% reported long-term use, and having filled three or more prescriptions during the study year.

Despite such pervasive antidepressant use, we’ve not seen any improvement in depression rates. On the contrary, it just seems to be getting worse, and the highest rates of depression are now reported among 18- to 25-year-olds.2

Suicide rates are at an all-time high as well. Statistics reveal suicide rates rose 31% between 2001 and 2017.3 In 2017, nearly 47,000 Americans committed suicide, making it the 10th most common cause of death that year.

While antidepressants are routinely used as a first-line treatment for depression, evidence suggests they cause more problems than they solve. Several studies have shown their effectiveness is on par with placebo,4,5 and some of the worst side effects have long been ignored, or worse, hidden.

Continue reading→

In Unit Stalked by Suicide, Veterans Try to Save One Another, by Dave Phillips

This is a tough article to read, but it is an article that should be read. Those who pound the drums for US military involvement rarely examine its consequences, one of which is what it does to the soldiers. Killing people, some of whom are innocents, seeing your friends wounded and killed, getting wounded yourself, complete confusion, the inability to pinpoint or even see one’s enemies, and the cumulative impact of the noise and percussive shock waves of artillery in battle messes with your head. Especially if you have just reached adulthood and you discover that the grand reasons you joined the military have nothing to do with what happens in the field. The argument still goes on to whether sending US troops to places like Afghanistan and Iraq has been a failure, but there is no argument that the way they are treated when they get back has been reprehensible. From Dave Phillips, at nytimes.com:

Members of a Marine battalion that served in a restive region in Afghanistan
have been devastated by the deaths of comrades and frustrated by the V.A.

After the sixth suicide in his old battalion, Manny Bojorquez sank onto his bed. With a half-empty bottle of Jim Beam beside him and a pistol in his hand, he began to cry.

He had gone to Afghanistan at 19 as a machine-gunner in the Marine Corps. In the 18 months since leaving the military, he had grown long hair and a bushy mustache. It was 2012. He was working part time in a store selling baseball caps and going to community college while living with his parents in the suburbs of Phoenix. He rarely mentioned the war to friends and family, and he never mentioned his nightmares.

He thought he was getting used to suicides in his old infantry unit, but the latest one had hit him like a brick: Joshua Markel, a mentor from his fire team, who had seemed unshakable. In Afghanistan, Corporal Markel volunteered for extra patrols and joked during firefights. Back home Mr. Markel appeared solid: a job with a sheriff’s office, a new truck, a wife and time to hunt deer with his father. But that week, while watching football on TV with friends, he had wordlessly gone into his room, picked up a pistol and killed himself. He was 25.

Still reeling from the news, Mr. Bojorquez surveyed the old baseball posters on the walls of his childhood bedroom and the sun-bleached body armor hanging on his bedpost. Then he took a long pull from the bottle.

“If he couldn’t make it,” he recalled thinking to himself, “what chance do I have?”

He pressed the loaded pistol to his brow and pulled the trigger.

To continue reading: Veterans Try to Save One Another