Tag Archives: Conspiracies

How conspiracy theorizing may soon get you labelled a ‘Domestic Terrorist’, by Matthew Ehret

People who don’t believe that two or more people in government sometimes agree to commit crimes or other illicit acts (the definition of conspiracy) have a name, too: idiots. From Matthew Ehret at off-guardian.org:

If you are starting to feel like forces controlling the governments of the west are out to get you, then it is likely that you are either a paranoid nut job, or a stubborn realist.

Either way, it means that you have some major problems on your hands.

If you don’t happen to find yourself among the tinfoil hat-wearing strata of conspiracy theorists waiting in a bunker for aliens to either strike down or save society from the shape shifting lizard people, but are rather contemplating how, in the 1960s, a shadow government took control of society over the dead bodies of many assassinated patriots, then certain conclusions tend to arise.

Three Elementary Realizations for Thinking People

The first conclusion you would likely arrive at is that the United States government was just put through the first coup in over 58 years (yes, what happened in 1963 was a coup).

Although it is becoming a bit prohibitive to speak such words aloud in polite society, Nancy Pelosi’s official biographer Molly Ball, recently penned a scandalous Time Magazine article entitled ‘The Secret History of the Shadow Campaign that Saved the 2020 Elections’ which admitted to this conspiracy saying:

Even though it sounds like a paranoid fever dream- a well-funded cabal of powerful people, ranging across industries and ideologies, working together behind the scenes to influence perceptions, change rules and laws, steer media coverage and control the flow of information.”

(Lest you think that this was a subversion of democracy, Ball informs us that “they were not rigging the election; they were fortifying it.”)

Another conclusion you might come to is that many of the political figures whom you believed were serving those who elected them into office, actually serve the interests of a clique of technocrats and billionaires lusting over the deconstruction of western civilization under something called “a Great Reset”.

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Conspiracies ‘R Us, by Donald Jeffries

Many conspiracies touted by conspiracy theorists don’t pan out, but many do. From Donald Jeffries at donaldjeffries. wordpress.com:

ll of us believe in some conspiracies. Many subscribe to the philosophy of the ultimate pessimist, that guy named Murphy, and his law, which observed that the other line moves faster. You know it’s going to rain after you wash your car, or painted something outside. The car’s going to need an emergency $500 repair, right after you get a $500 bonus. A gust of wind will come along and mess up your new hairdo. The list is endless.

Most people believe at least some things are rigged against them. They may not extend that to the system being rigged against average people everywhere, but in their own personal lives, they nod their heads knowingly when something goes awry. You play the same number all the time in the lottery, and the one day you don’t buy a ticket, are you surprised that it finally comes up? It’s only paranoid when you start talking about shadowy, powerful forces.

Every year, the world’s government, business, and media leaders meet in absolute secrecy at ritzy hotels around the world. The so-called Bilderberg group was never written about for decades, outside of the feisty weekly newspaper The Spotlight. Their existence was denied by all respectable people. With the advent of increased citizen journalism on the internet, these power brokers were filmed going in and out of these meetings. Intrepid reporters like the late Jim Tucker snuck inside and took their attendee list and agenda. Hearty citizen journalists gathered outside and attempted, almost always unsuccessfully, to interview the participants. Now, the Bilderbergers are a real thing, but you’re a “conspiracy theorist” if you believe the most influential people in the world meet for any significant reason.

In the summer, the elite hold another confab, in the mountains of northern California. For decades, it was “crazy” to claim that powerful, strictly male figures would get together in secrecy, and worship a giant owl. Then Alex Jones snuck into Bohemian Grove and filmed the “cremation of care” ceremony, which took place under a giant owl. Walter Cronkite was the voice of the owl for many years. But we’re still assured that they’re just getting together to relax.

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How Conspiracy Theorizing May Soon Get You Labelled a ‘Domestic Terrorist’, by Matthew Ehret

There are things that don’t make it into the equations of the world government crowd. Things like individual conscience, honor, patriotism, and the unquenchable desire to live free. From Matthew Ehret at strategic-culture.org:

Conspiracies for good and for evil do exist now, as they have from time immemorial, Matthew Ehret writes. The only question is which intention do you want to devote your life towards?

If you are starting to feel like forces controlling the governments of the west are out to get you, then it is likely that you are either a paranoid nut job, or a stubborn realist.

Either way, it means that you have some major problems on your hands.

If you don’t happen to find yourself among the tinfoil hat-wearing strata of conspiracy theorists waiting in a bunker for aliens to either strike down or save society from the shape shifting lizard people, but are rather contemplating how, in the 1960s, a shadow government took control of society over the dead bodies of many assassinated patriots, then certain conclusions tend to arise.

Three Elementary Realizations for Thinking People

The first conclusion you would likely arrive at is that the United States government was just put through the first coup in over 58 years (yes, what happened in 1963 was a coup). Although it is becoming a bit prohibitive to speak such words aloud in polite society, Nancy Pelosi’s official biographer Molly Ball, recently penned a scandalous Time Magazine article entitled ‘The Secret History of the Shadow Campaign that Saved the 2020 Elections’ which admitted to this conspiracy saying:

“Even though it sounds like a paranoid fever dream- a well-funded cabal of powerful people, ranging across industries and ideologies, working together behind the scenes to influence perceptions, change rules and laws, steer media coverage and control the flow of information.” (Lest you think that this was a subversion of democracy, Ball informs us that “they were not rigging the election; they were fortifying it.”)

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The Tycoon Plot, by Israel Shamir

Is there a group of multi-billionaires who aspire to be real life Bond villains? From Israel Shamir at unz.com:

Millionaires want to make money. Billionaires want to make history. We may add that multi-billionaires take it further; they want mankind to adapt to their needs and wishes. As for people who control trillions, why, they care about our wishes as much as we care about ants while sweeping the garden. We do not apply ant-killer until anthills encroach on our flowerbeds; but we do not hesitate if we deem it necessary. Mankind came across many megalomaniacs; some of them had a lot of power. Genghis Khan was one. However, they were always territorially limited. Mighty Genghis could send tremors all the way to Rome, but the English and French didn’t have to care about the rising Mongol empire. New super-tycoons have no such limitations. Globalisation has allowed them to think outside the box. Their moves had been long anticipated by cinema, the world of dreams. As dreams allow a psychologist to ponder man’s desires and fears, cinematography offers insights into the collective ego of mankind. What did we fear in the relatively free Seventies?

A classic villain of 1970s and 80s was the evil tycoon. James Bond took on some of them. Meet Hugo Drax of the Moonraker, or Karl Stromberg of The Spy Who Loved Me; these guys were willing to destroy mankind to replace it with a better version. Stromberg planned to trigger a global nuclear war and survive it underwater. Drax intended to poison mankind with his deadly gas and repopulate the world with his new chosen ones. Another one was de Wynter, the super-villain of The Avengers, played by Sean Connery. He controlled the world weather, and could kill us all off by hurricanes and tsunamis.

Before the tycoons, when the Cold war raged, a villain was a KGB agent or a Chinese operative. As détente calmed relations between the blocks, the agents went out of fashion; later, the fantastic villains of Marvel came into a vogue. The evil tycoons were uncomfortably close to the real thing; and they moved from the cinematic world into our reality.

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“Baseless Conspiracy Theories” and our Knowledge Crisis. By Adam Ellwanger

Is what we’re in a knowledge crisis, or is it a crisis of stick your fingers in your ears and scream to avoid anything you regard as unpleasant or not in alignment with your politics? Fro Adam Ellwanger at humanevents.com:

Evidence, proof, and the will to deceive.

The news that the FBI is investigating Hunter Biden on suspicion of money laundering and foreign influence peddling should come as no surprise, given that the New York Post broke the story over two months ago. Of course, when that publication released the incriminating evidence that was saved to a laptop owned by Hunter Biden, the story was immediately censored on social media. Of the few major media outlets that were willing to acknowledge the existence of the story, virtually all of them did so only to emphasize that the reporting was “baseless” nonsense.

When pressed on the matter by President Trump in a debate, Joe Biden boasted that five former heads of the CIA said that the story was “a bunch of garbage.” A couple of days earlier, dozens of former intelligence officials had signed a statement that asserted the news had all the classic earmarks of a Russian information operation: “We want to emphasize that we do not know if the emails, provided to the New York Post by President Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, are genuine or not and that we do not have evidence of Russian involvement,” the statement read, “just that our experience makes us deeply suspicious that the Russian government played a significant role in this case.”

Bush administration speechwriter and Atlantic editor David Frum claimed on Twitter that “The story could not have been more obviously fake if it had been wearing dollar-store spectacles and attached plastic mustache.” Weeks after the FBI investigation of Hunter Biden was confirmed, Wikipedia still labels their entry on the matter as a “conspiracy theory.” Thus, in spite of emails, photographs, and video-recorded evidence to the contrary, any claim that the Bidens did anything improper (let alone “wrong” or “illegal”) was deemed “baseless.”

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A Conspiracy Theorist Confesses, by Iain Davis

Legally, a conspiracy is an agreement by two or more people to commit a crime or do some other wrong. By that criterion, SLL thinks that government, organized crime, is full of conspiracies. So does Iain Davis at off-guardian.org:

I am what the general population, politicians and the mainstream media (MSM) would call a conspiracy theorist. While I don’t agree with their definition of the term, there’s not much point in me denying it. It is applied to me, and millions like me, whether we like it or not.

For those who deem conspiracy theorists to be some sort of threat to society, we are the social and political malcontents who lack reason and hate our democratic way of life. We are trolls, bots and disinformation agents on social media, probably employed by the Russians, the Chinese or Iranians.

We are supposedly hellbent on sewing the seeds of discontent and can be found protesting against every government policy and decision. Alternatively, we are arrogant fools, both anti-science and evidence averse, who trot out crazy theories based upon little knowledge and no evidence. Apparently this is a very dangerous thing.

Thus we come to the glaring contradiction at the heart of the concept of the loony conspiracy theorist. Conspiracy theorists are both imbeciles, who don’t have any proof to back up anything they say, while simultaneously being dangerous subversives who threaten to destabilise democracy and foment chaos.

Which is it? It can’t be both. Unless society is so fragile it cannot withstand the opinions of idiots.

So where does the idea that fools present a threat to “our way of life,” come from? What is it that the conspiracy theorists say that is so dangerous? Why do their opinions seemingly need to be censored? What are governments so worried about?

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Coincidence Theorists See All Donut and No Holes in the Coronation of The Cult, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Somebody’s pulling the coronavirus and George Floyd strings. From Doug “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

Over the past several decades Americans have viewed regularly televised dramatic episodes of political theater. The use of the word “episode” is especially appropriate because the dramatic scenes are sequential and continuously broadcasted onto electronic screens. The drama is designed to elicit emotion, foment anger, and unite or divide the nation in order to, ultimately, affect change.

The societal cataclysms we’re experiencing now could be naturally occurring – as the result of certain trends like demographics, technology, modernization, education, centralization, economic inequality, political platforms, or even systemic corruption and civilizational decay. On the other hand, it could be the upheavals are directed in consonance with scripts written by an inner circle of powerful people; and in accordance to the Hegelian Dialectic.  How citizens view the changes realized by the United States over the last few decades, in particular, will depend upon their interpretations of probabilities and outcomes; or, rather, to the extent they believe in coincidence or conspiracy.

Many believe grand conspiracies are implausible because ambitious schemes so often fail and it’s inconceivable that scrupulous whistleblowers would refuse to expose the plans of powerful conspirators.  And these objections have a ring of truth… unless, of course, the powerful few have only advanced those who’ve demonstrated allegiance while shunning, banishing, imprisoning, or “expiring” those who won’t fall in line.  Perhaps this would explain why the likes of Brennen, Clapper, Comey, and McCabe continue about their book tours as Assange, Manafort, and Stone remain under lock and key.

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They Killed King for the Same Reason They Killed Kennedy, by Jacob G. Hornberger

The “They” in the title is a group of conspirators within the government and their outside confederates. From Jacob G. Hornberger at fff.org:

Amidst all the anti-Russia brouhaha that has enveloped our nation, we shouldn’t forget that the U.S. national-security establishment — specifically the Pentagon, CIA, and FBI — was convinced that Martin Luther King Jr. was a communist agent who was spearheading a communist takeover of the United States.

This occurred during the Cold War, when Americans were made to believe that there was a gigantic international communist conspiracy to take over the United States and the rest of the world. The conspiracy, they said, was centered in Moscow, Russia — yes, that Russia!

That was, in fact, the justification for converting the federal government to a national-security state type of governmental structure after the end of World War II. The argument was that a limited-government republic type of governmental structure, which was the nation’s founding governmental system, was insufficient to prevent a communist takeover of the United States. To prevail over the communists in what was being called a “Cold War,” it would be necessary for the federal government, they said, to become a national-security state so that it could wield the same type of sordid, dark-side, totalitarian-like practices that the communists themselves wielded and exercised.

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The Hidden Hand, by Charles “Sam” Faddis

The important question in the Russiagate and Ukrainegate scandals is who’s pulling the strings. From Charles “Sam” Faddis at andmagazine.com:

The essence of a coup, which some might refer to as covert action, is the hidden hand.  One does not announce that a foreign power is overthrowing the government and installing a new government.  One pulls strings as if from behind a curtain, making events that are all part of a carefully orchestrated plan appear disconnected, spontaneous and serendipitous.

As I read through the recently released IG report for the second time, as someone with a great deal of experience in military and intelligence matters, I see that hand everywhere.

Per the IG report, a single report is delivered to the FBI in the summer of 2016.  It concerns a meeting between a cooperative contact of a foreign intelligence service and a junior level employee of the Trump campaign, George Papadopoulos.  The report relates what are frankly very amorphous comments by Papadopoulos concerning the Russian government and its alleged possession of information on Hillary Clinton.

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16 Facts, 16 Years Later About 9/11 That Are No Longer A “Conspiracy Theory”, by Arjun Walia

Many things about the official 9/11 story line don’t add up. From Arjun Walia at lewrockwell.com:

There are still many people who instantly place those who question the official narrative of  9/11 within the conspiracy realm. They do this automatically, without ever investigating or questioning for themselves, simply trusting in whatever narrative is provided to them via mainstream media. This is partly due to fear — it’s easier, and more comfortable, and less frightening to believe there are enemies far from home who wish us harm than to consider that the people we chose to put in positions of great power here in our own country are manipulating us, and lying to us. It would definitely bring up some cognitive dissonance, and this is why the “conspiracy” reaction is still prevalent, because there are some who believe that ignorance is bliss.

More Than 165 Million Americans Don’t Believe The Official 9/11 Story and Think the Government Is Covering Something Up

The latest polls show that 54.3% of the American population doesn’t believe the official story that their government told them, and that they “strongly agree” or “report” their belief that something else actually happened on that day.

We’re talking about approximately 160 million people, and that’s just in America. Imagine what the numbers would look like if the polls were conducted globally?

Do you really think this many people could believe in such a “conspiracy theory” just because? The reason why the majority of the American population does believe that a false flag event occurred on 9/11 is because a wealth of information has emerged, in the form of documents, videos, witness testimony, studies, and more, that clearly points to the fact that our own government lied to us. People are not stupid, and 160 million people aren’t simply going to believe something just for the sake of it; there are reasons behind their beliefs.

To continue reading: 16 Facts, 16 Years Later About 9/11 That Are No Longer A “Conspiracy Theory”