Tag Archives: North Korea

Talk to, Don’t Provoke, North Korea, by Sheldon Richman

According to Sheldon Richman, one good thing Bill Clinton did was negotiate an agreement with North Korea that stopped them from building nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, that agreement was tossed out by George W. Bush. From Richman at antiwar.com:

There’s little more we can do than hope that some cool heads around Donald Trump are telling him he’d be nuts to attack North Korea. I don’t know who they might be. Still, we must hope.

It doesn’t take a lifetime of study to know that, fortunately, no military resolution of the standoff is available. Ten million South Koreans live within artillery reach of the capital of Seoul, some 30 miles from the demilitarized zone separating North and South. Nearly 30,000 U.S. military personnel are around there too. North Korea has thousands of underground and undersea military facilities that American bombs and missiles would not find. A conventional US attack would be catastrophic, a nuclear attack far, far worse, for the horrifying effects would spill over to China and Japan.

So what would be accomplished? Nothing good. That’s for sure.

Where, then, is the Trump from a year ago? You know, the one who said, “I would speak to him [North Korean tyrant Kim Jong-un]. I would have no problem speaking to him.”? As we well know, there are many Donald Trumps. Well, that’s the one we need now. Instead we have sabre-rattling Trump, along with Vice President Pence and others on the national-security squad.

The two governments have much to talk about. (Alas, as long as we’re stuck with the Westphalian system, we must make the best of it.) First things first. And by first, I mean peace.

Yes, Kim, like his father and grandfather before him, is a tyrant. But when has that ever stopped an American president from dealing with — and often befriending — a ruler? Never. American presidents have allied with some of the most ruthless heads of states of the 20th century. Trump recently entertained a tyrant — al-Sisi of Egypt — at the White House, praising him profusely. Then he called the head of Turkey — Erdogan — to congratulate him on expanding his autocratic powers through the ballot box. Nixon went to meet Mao Zedong, one of the great mass murderers in history, to open normal relations with what we once called Red China.

Kim and North Korea, therefore, are not unique in that respect. But they are unique in another way. The US government fought an undeclared war — sorry, police action — alongside South Korea’s own tyrant — Syngman Rhee — against North Korea and Kim’s grandfather — Kim Il-sung — from 1950 to 1953 because President Harry Truman didn’t want the Republicans saying he “lost Korea.” The US Air Force obliterated the country through carpet bombing after Truman decided atomic bombs were not practical, in contrast to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, a few years earlier. The bombing and shooting stopped with an armistice, but no peace treaty was ever signed to formally end the war. For decades, the North Korean government has sought that treaty and a nonaggression pact with the US government, but the requests always fell on deaf ears.

To continue reading: Talk to, Don’t Provoke, North Korea

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Phony Hysterics Over North Korea, by Justin Raimondo

Kim Jong-Un and North Korea are nowhere near the threats they are currently made out to be. From Justin Raimondo at antiwar.com:

Threat inflation is the name of the game

A lot of my job as editorial director of Antiwar.com is cutting through the veil of obfuscation with which the War Party masks its ill intentions. But sometimes you don’t even have to read between the lines to see what our conniving rulers are up to. Such is the case with the current war scare around North Korea.

President Trump is playing this for all it’s worth, summoning the Senate to a special conclave at the White House to inform them of the supposedly dire threat. This ostentatious display was preceded by a hearing before the House Armed Services Committee at which Admiral Harry Harris, in charge of the US Pacific Command, sounded the alarm:

“Kim Jong-Un is clearly in a position to threaten Hawaii today, in my opinion. I have suggested that we consider putting interceptors in Hawaii that . . . defend (it) directly, and that we look at a defensive Hawaii radar.”

The idea that the North Korean despot is going to pull off another Pearl Harbor is so off the wall that one has to wonder what the Admiral is smoking. To begin with, the North Koreans don’t have the technical capacity to reach Hawaii: their most recent test, reportedly of a medium range ballistic missile, failed on launch. Another failureof a medium range missile test occurred earlier in the month, when the rocket went haywire in the skies and exploded in a fiery crash in the sea. And in March, they chalked up two failures, when they fired a flurry of test missiles, only four of which landed 160 miles off the coast of Japan, and another of a medium range missile that “exploded within seconds of launch.”

They didn’t do much better in 2016, with a whole string of failures that limn their infamous 2006 “nuclear” test – which was either a fizzle or a fake.

To continue reading: Phony Hysterics Over North Korea

It’s Time to Stop Pretending North Korea Is a Threat to the United States, by James Holbrooks

When you’re “offering” protection everything is a threat, and there’s no bigger protection racket than the US government. From James Holbrooks at theantimedia.org:

North Korea is a threat, goes the narrative. And we, as loyal Americans, should fear the potentiality of that fact.

That’s why U.S. aircraft carriers, accompanied by fighter jets and warships, are currently steaming toward the Korean Peninsula.

That’s why Japan, staunch U.S. ally, is considering deploying troops to South Korea — in preparation for the time when that evil dictator from the north will try to harm Japanese nationals in the south.

Conveniently, if Japan does deploy those troops — and, let’s be honest, they will — that will put the coalition of Japan, South Korea, and the United States together on the Korean peninsula.

Consider that for a moment.

They actually want us to believe that it would take the combined military might of the U.S., Japan, and South Korea to take out Kim Jong-un. There literally is no other way to look at it.

As in all cases when it comes to geopolitical analysis, it helps to look at a map. North Korea is sandwiched between a U.S.-occupied territory to the south and a global superpower, China, to the north.

In what universe does it make sense that Kim Jong-un would think attacking an “enemy” in the region would be beneficial? On Monday, Anti-Media reported on the fact that former Pentagon chief William Perry told CNN in November that North Korea would never strike first because, very simply, Kim doesn’t want to die.

“I do not believe the North Korean regime is suicidal,” he said. “Therefore, I don’t believe they’re going to launch an unprovoked nuclear attack on anyone.”

That’s because Kim has certainly applied to the situation what the mainstream narrative would like you to discard — common sense. With just a dash of it, any logical being can look at the events unfolding and see that North Korea poses no threat, to any surrounding nation, period.

To continue reading: It’s Time to Stop Pretending North Korea Is a Threat to the United States

What A War With North Korea Would Probably Look Like, by Brandon Smith

It wouldn’t be pretty. From Brandon Smith at alt-market.com:

Back in 2013 during the last major flare up between the U.S. and North Korea I wrote an extensive analysis on the North Korean wild card and how it could be used by globalists as a catalyst for international economic instability titled ‘Will Globalists Use North Korea To Trigger Catastrophe?’ As I have warned consistently over the years, like Syria, North Korea is a longstanding chaos box; a big red button that the elites can press any time they wish to instigate a chain of greater geopolitical tensions. The question has always been, will they actually use it?

Well, it appears that under the Trump administration the establishment might go for broke. I have not seen U.S. war rhetoric so intense since the second invasion of Iraq, and all over missile tests which have been standard fare for North Korea for many years. With whispers by Trump aides of a possible 50,000 boots on the ground in Syria, and open discussion of preemptive strikes in North Korea, this time kinetic conflict is highly likely.

Yes, we have see such military pressures before, but this time feels different. Why is an aimless quagmire war with massive potential global financial repercussions more likely under Trump? Because Trump ran under a nationalist conservative banner, and he will forever be labeled a nationalist conservative even if his behavior appears to be more globalist in nature. Rhetoric is often more psychologically powerful in the minds of the masses than action. Therefore, EVERYTHING Trump does from now on will also be labeled a product of the “nationalist conservative” ideology; including all of his screw-ups. And, with Trump in office the establishment is perfectly happy to pursue actions once considered taboo, because demonizing conservatives and liberty proponents is one of their primary objectives.

To continue reading: What A War With North Korea Would Probably Look Like

The Historic and Factual Basis of N. Korea’s Hatred of the US, by Russ Winter

It may astound some Americans, but there are people in this world who hate us, and some of them have pretty good reasons for doing so. From Russ Winter on a guest post at theburningplatform.com:

When one knows the hidden history about the massive targeting of North Korean civilians with so-called strategic bombing, it’s easier to understand the hate from that country and see that it’s not manufactured. It’s rooted in a fact-based narrative. By the time the Korean War ended on July 27, 1953, B-29s alone had flown over 21,000 sorties, dropping nearly 600,000 tons of bombs. Fighter aircraft flew thousands of additional sorties over North Korea.

After China entered the war in late 1950, the United States switched to targeting civilians in much the same manner as conducted over Germany and Japan during WWII. Gen. Douglas MacArthur designated cities and villages in North Korea as “main bombing targets” and permitted the use of incendiary bombs.

The bombing of Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital, was conducted as part of a sustained U.S. Air Force aerial bombardment campaign. By the time of the armistice, 75 percent of Pyongyang was destroyed as part of a broader U.S. bombing effort throughout the country. It cost the lives of nearly 3 million North Koreans (mostly civilians) by the time the war ended.

The campaign was conducted by the blood thirsty Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command, who also has the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians on his hands from WWII.

LeMay bragged, “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population during the Korean War”.

Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.”

After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the latter stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

This means that virtually every person living in North Korea today has siblings, parents, grandparents or great grandparents that perished in this total war. It is a real stretch to gaslight Koreans as “crazy” or “irrational” given this reality. It is also the height of ignorance to not understand North Korea’s need for powerful retaliatory weapons.

To continue reading: The Historic and Factual Basis of N. Korea’s Hatred of the US

Why The Donald Should Cool It On North Korea – The Fat Boy Can’t Even Deliver His ‘Little Boy’, by David Stockman

David Stockman provides some sorely needed perspective on the North Korean threat. From Stockman at antiwar.com:

The realized truth of modern history is crystal clear. Washington had no business intervening in a quarrel between two no-count wanna be dictators (Syngman Rhee and Kim il Sung) on the Korean peninsula in June 1950, and surely has no business still stationing 29,000 American soldiers there 67 years latter.

Yet owing to the institutionalized albatross of that mis-vectored history, the world is now much closer to the brink of nuclear war than at any time since the dark days of the early cold war. And the Donald has become just the latest political tourist in the Oval Office to succumb to the Deep State’s false, self-serving narrative about why the American imperium remains decamped on the 38th parallel.

For sure, it was never about the real estate. After 40 years of brutal and predatory Japanese occupation, post-war Korea was an economic backwater with the GDP of perhaps Cleveland, Ohio. It had been divided at the 38th parallel by Truman and Stalin as an afterthought at Potsdam (July 1945). Far from any intent to create separate nations on a peninsula that had been ethnically and politically unified for centuries, the line only marked a convenient staging grounds for the impending final attack on Japan that Stalin had committed to aid.

In fact, Washington’s suave original cold warrior, Dean Acheson, had described the Potsdam demarcation as a mere “surveyors line”. But as US/Soviet tensions heated up in the late 1940’s, the US occupation forces in the south encouraged the puppet government they had established under ex-pat and Washington dandy, Syngman Rhee, to cleanse the country of left-wing influences and prepare to eventually rule the entire penninsula.

To continue reading: Why The Donald Should Cool It On North Korea – The Fat Boy Can’t Even Deliver His ‘Little Boy’

War Cries Drown Out ‘America First’, by Patrick J. Buchanan

Is President Trump being played by Chinese President Xi Jinping? From Patrick J. Buchanan at buchanan.org:

“Why would I call China a currency manipulator when they are working with us on the North Korean problem?” tweeted President Donald Trump on Easter Sunday.

Earlier, after discovering “great chemistry” with Chinese President Xi Jinping over “the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake” at Mar-a-Lago, Trump had confided, “I explained … that a trade deal with the U.S. will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem!”

“America First” thus takes a back seat to big-power diplomacy with Beijing. One wonders: How much will Xi end up bilking us for his squeezing of Kim Jong Un?

Trump once seemed to understand how America had been taken to the cleaners during and after the Cold War. While allies supported us diplomatically, they piled up huge trade surpluses at our expense and became virtual free-riders off the U.S. defense effort.

No nations were more successful at this than South Korea and Japan. Now Xi is playing the game — and perhaps playing Trump.

What is the “North Korean problem” Beijing will help solve in return for more indulgent consideration on future U.S.-China trade deals?

North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. As 80 percent of Pyongyang’s trade comes through China, Trump believes that Beijing can force Kim to stop testing missiles and atomic bombs before he produces an intercontinental ballistic missile that could hit the U.S.

But what is to prevent Xi from pocketing Trump’s concessions and continuing on the strategic course China has long pursued?

For in many ways, Pyongyang’s goals parallel China’s.

Neither could want an all-out war on the Korean Peninsula. For Kim, this would devastate his country, bring down his regime, and cost him his life. For China, war could mean millions of Koreans crossing the Yalu into Manchuria and a disruption of Beijing’s march to Asian hegemony.

To continue reading: War Cries Drown Out ‘America First’