Tag Archives: Republicans

The party’s over: Republicans and Democrats are both finished, by Jake Novak

We can only hope. From Jake Novak at cnbc.com, of all places:

Stick a fork in the Democrats and Republicans.

Wednesday night’s latest round of deal making between President Donald Trump and Democratic congressional leaders is the latest evidence that the major political parties have lost all semblance of real power.

Never before have we seen the leadership of both major political parties so humbled. That power vacuum is currently enabling the president to act without any loyalty to his own party, while working with whomever he pleases on whatever issues he wants.

 It’s why we have a Republican congressional leadership, headlined by a Senate Majority Leader with an 18 percent approval rating in his own home state, that could not deliver on its party’s seven-year-long promises to repeal and replace Obamacare.

And it’s why the Democratic Party is getting more and more embarrassed as its highly-experienced-but-failed 2016 presidential nominee continues to weaken the brand by going on a national tour blaming everyone else for her election loss.

None of the above would have been possible before then-candidate Trump eviscerated a crowded field of 16 more experienced GOP regulars in the 2016 primaries. It wouldn’t be possible before Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent who only registered as a Democrat months before the primaries, came extremely close to upsetting long-held party plans to nominate Hillary Clinton. (Now that same Senator Sanders is leading a march away from Democratic Party orthodoxy and fully advocating single payer health care, with a third of the Democrats in the Senate happily marching away with him.)

To continue reading: The party’s over: Republicans and Democrats are both finished

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The 2016 Election is Not Reversible, by Angelo Codevilla

American politics has become the government party versus those who oppose government and the ruling class. That will continue regardless of Trump’s fate. From Angelo Codevilla at theburningplatform.com:

Today, the bipartisan ruling class, which the electorate was trying to shed by supporting anti-establishment candidates of both parties in 2016, feels as if it has dodged the proverbial bullet. The Trump administration has not managed to staff itself—certainly not with anti-establishment people—and may never do so. Because the prospect of that happening brought the ruling class’s several elements together and energized them as never before, today, prospects of more power with fewer limits than ever eclipse the establishment’s fears of November 2016.

But the Left’s celebrations are premature, at best. As I explained a year ago, by 2016 the ruling class’s dysfunctions and the rest of the country’s resentment had pushed America over the threshold of a revolution; one in which the only certainty is the near impossibility of returning to the republican self-government of the previous two centuries. The 2016 election is not reversible, because it was but the first stage of a process that no one can control and the end of which no one can foresee.

Trump’s troubles

The Left’s optimism is not unfounded. Trump, in his Afghanistan speech, told his voters that he is reversing a campaign promise because he was instructed that his, and their, basic instincts on foreign affairs are wrong. Similarly influenced, he is continuing to use unappropriated funds to subsidize insurance companies that practice Obamacare even though a Federal Court held this to be unconstitutional—far from undoing it as he had promised. Nevertheless he complies with rulings by single judges that overturn major political commitments of his. Unforced errors, all.

Meanwhile, the leaders of the Republican majorities in the Senate and House reject responsibility for failing to repeal Obamacare and even for failing to pass ordinary appropriations bills. They take every occasion to distance themselves from Trump, notably imputing to him insufficient disdain for racism and other political taboos. When Corporate America withdrew from the president’s business council, it premised this officious separation on implicit accusations of the same sort. In short, the Republican establishment now joins Hillary Clinton in leveling “deplorable” allegations against Trump and, above all, of his supporters. Nevertheless, Trump agreed to endorse that establishment’s candidate in the Alabama senatorial primary against one of his own supporters. Counterintuitive.

To continue reading: The 2016 Election is Not Reversible

The Slow Death of the Republican Party, by Brent Bozell III

SLL will probably have some important toenail clipping to do, or something, that will prevent attendance at the funeral, whenever they get around to holding it. From Brent Bozell III at breitbart.com:

The Grand Old Party is about to commit suicide.  

All this talk about Trump this, and Trump that, masks a far bigger political controversy. The Republican Party leadership in Washington, D.C., has fundamentally betrayed its constituents and they are about to learn that they’ve been double-crossed — for years.

Every Republican candidate’s stock speech sounds the same, the thunderous roar about a government out of control, federal spending out of control (insert charts and graphs and why, if you stack hundred dollar bills, they will reach the edge of the universe), federal taxes out of control (insert comparisons to socialist countries), the federal bureaucracy out of control (insert metaphors about chains, yokes, and the like), the family shattered with federal funding of abortion a crime against humanity (watch for it — there! The heart-wrenching sob), and our military is emasculated.

Two more items were added to the menu, courtesy of Obama. Obamacare Will Be Repealed! and Illegal Immigration Will Not Stand!  

In 2009, the Democrats controlled everything, partly due to the Republicans’ cowardice on Capitol Hill, and in part because of some of the most inept candidates and campaigns America has seen in years. The Obama folks could have played it safe but went for socialist gold, using the power of the legislative and the executive branches (and later the judiciary, thank you Justice Roberts) to advance their agenda.

That included federal spending on a level unmatched in human history resulting ultimately in a $19 trillion in debt we simply cannot pay, and with so many tens of trillions of dollars in unfunded liabilities that “infinity” is not far behind. One seventh of the economy was confiscated by the federal government with the passage of Obamacare. Our national borders were declared open and discussions over our national sovereignty closed. And to top it off, the Democrats all but declared themselves above the law.

The GOP harrumphed that this would not stand, by God! If only… if only America would vote them into the majority.

In 2009, the Tea Party was born. The Grand Old Party was rejuvenated. Happy days were here again.

To continue reading: The Slow Death of the Republican Party

Trump, the CIA and the Yokeldom, by Raúl Ilargi Meijer

Solutions to today’s pressing problems will not come from within existing political arrangements. From Raúl Ilargi Meijer at theautmaticearth.com:

The western world is mired in a mile-deep political crisis and nary a soul seems to notice, or rather: everyone just sees their own little preferred echochamber tidbits of it. Which is not a good thing, because that crisis is bound to trigger other bigger crises that are much more damaging. And I’m sorry to say it, but Donald Trump is not your main problem. Not even close.

The main problem is the collapse of western political systems. While that is what brought Trump to power in the first place, he didn’t cause the collapse. The collapse is also what ‘gave you’ Brexit, and Trump didn’t cause that either. Moreover, in the next step, on the far end of all this, Trump may well be the only thing standing between you and CIA warfare. I know, who wants to hear that, right?! Who’s ready for that next step?

But it’s not that crazy. Trump was the one who stopped the CIA from arming Syrian ‘rebels’, which are just a bunch of extremists gathered by that same CIA in its attempts to unseat Assad, and who Trump saw laughingly beheading a child. And who was it that had previously, and enthusiastically, decided to support these crazies? The US Republican and Democratic parties, in unison, while Obama was president and Hillary slash Joe Biden was Secretary of State. Remember the Chelsea Manning footage of videogame-like drone killings? What did Obama do about that?

Still, that’s not where the core of the demise of our political systems lies. Though it does gave us a flavor of their priorities. The core can be found in economic issues. In both president Bush II and president Obama bailing out banks while letting people’s incomes and wealth tank, and not sueing any banker for anything at all. Obviously, the same scenario played out in Britain as well. And in many other nations.

To continue reading: Trump, the CIA and the Yokeldom

Another Failed Republican Revolution, by Laurence M. Vance

The Republicans have compiled a dismal record of failure, repudiating most if not all of their supposed ideological premises. From Laurence M. Vance at lewrockwell.com:

Another Republican revolution has now failed.

A Republican revolution can be defined as a time when Republicans gained control of both Houses of Congress and therefore were in a position to severely limit the federal government.

There have been five Republican revolutions in modern times, and they have all ended in failure.

The first Republican revolution occurred in 1946 when Republicans regained control of both Houses of Congress after four elections of FDR to the presidency and years of Democratic rule. With a Democrat in the White House (Harry Truman), their hands were somewhat tied, and they lost control of the Congress in the next election. Unfortunately, however, the Republicans joined with Truman in passing the National Security Act of 1947 which created the CIA and began the national security state. The Republicans failed.

The second Republican revolution occurred in 1952 when Republicans regained control of both Houses of Congress and a Republican was elected president. The Republicans only controlled both Houses of Congress during the first two years of Dwight Eisenhower’s presidency (1953-1955). But if ever Roosevelt’s New Deal could have been repealed in its entirety this was the time. It wasn’t, and now we live in a full-blown welfare state. The Republicans failed.

The third Republican revolution occurred in 1994 when Republicans—for the first time in fifty years—regained control of both Houses of Congress. (Republicans did control the Senate for the first six years of Ronald Reagan’s presidency [1981-1987], but that was a Reagan revolution, not a Republican revolution.) The Republicans managed to hang on to control of the Congress for the last six years of Bill Clinton’s presidency. But once again, because a Democrat was in the White House, their hands were somewhat tied. But this is no excuse for spending more money every year and increasing the national debt by $1.4 trillion by the end of Clinton’s second term. (See here on the myth of the Clinton surplus.) The Republicans also expanded the welfare state by increasing the Earned Income Tax Credit every year and instituting the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) that provides federally-funded health insurance to children in families with incomes too high to qualify for Medicaid. The Republicans failed.

To continue reading: Another Failed Republican Revolution

Is Health Care a Right or a Good? by Andrew P. Napolitano

Both Obamacare and its proposed replacement treat health care as a right. The constitution specifies no right to medical care or any other good or service because we all can’t have a “right” that someone else must pay for. From Andrew P. Napolitano at lewrockwell.com:

The political fiasco that unfolded last week as President Donald Trump and the Republican House leadership failed to pass legislation repealing the Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare, is attributable as much to the failure of politics as it is to the failure of politicians to understand the constitutional role of the federal government.

Republicans could not muster a majority in the House, which they control because a determined small group of them want to remove the federal government from the regulation of health care and believe that the replacement for Obamacare that House leaders have offered would keep too much of it in place. The president and his allies have argued that their bill would invalidate enough of Obamacare to return free choices to health care and to fulfill their campaign promises. Neither side has prevailed.

Here is the back story.

When Congress passed Obamacare in 2010, it did so without a single Republican vote. The premise underlying the highly partisan 2,700-page legislation is that health care is a right belonging to everyone in America and the federal government has a constitutional duty to provide it.

The political structure of Obamacare mandates that every person in America obtain health insurance, that every employer of more than 50 people in America pay for the health insurance of all employees who work more than 30 hours per week, that every policy of health insurance cover a large dimension of potential medical needs and that those earning under a certain annual income level receive health care at the expense of the rest of us. The failure to obtain and maintain health insurance triggers a tax burden — equivalent to the annual premium on a health insurance policy — for every year one goes without coverage.

To continue reading: Is Health Care a Right or a Good?

The Ryancare Route — Winning by Losing? by Patrick J. Buchanan

It’s easier to pull a ten-foot tall weed by hand than it is to get rid of a government program. Obamacare must be gotten rid of and replaced by (hint: it’s not another government program) the free market! Ryancare wasn’t even in field goal range and its defeat was well-deserved. From Patrick J. Buchanan at buchanan.org:

Did the Freedom Caucus just pull the Republican Party back off the ledge, before it jumped to its death? A case can be made for that.

Before the American Health Care Act, aka “Ryancare,” was pulled off the House floor Friday, it enjoyed the support — of 17 percent of Americans. Had it passed, it faced an Antietam in the GOP Senate, and probable defeat.

Had it survived there, to be signed by President Trump, it would have meant 14 million Americans losing their health insurance in 2018.

First among the losers would have been white working-class folks who delivered the Rust Belt states to President Trump.

“Victory has a thousand fathers; defeat is an orphan,” said JFK.

So, who are the losers here?

First and foremost, Speaker Paul Ryan and House Republicans who, having voted 50 times over seven years to repeal Obamacare, we learned, had no consensus plan ready to replace it.

Moreover, they put a bill on the floor many had not read, and for which they did not have the votes.

More than a defeat, this was a humiliation. For the foreseeable future, a Republican Congress and president will coexist with a health care regime that both loathe but cannot together repeal and replace.

Moreover, this defeat suggests that, given the ideological divide in the GOP, and the unanimous opposition of congressional Democrats, the most impressive GOP majorities since the 1920s may be impotent to enact any major complicated or complex legislation.

Friday’s failure appears to be another milestone in the decline and fall of Congress, which the Constitution, in Article I, fairly anoints as our first branch of government.

To continue reading: The Ryancare Route — Winning by Losing?