Tag Archives: Statistics

What the Hell is Going On? (Part Two), by Jim Quinn

Part Two of Jim Quinn’s shredding of the mainstream media’s fairy tales about the economy. From Quinn at theburningplatform.com:

In Part One of this article I exposed the establishment narrative of a strong economy as rubbish by providing hard data regarding imploding gasoline usage, failing bricks and mortar retailers and plunging restaurant sales.

“Inflation may indeed bring benefits for a short time to favored groups, but only at the expense of others. And in the long run it brings ruinous consequences to the whole community. Even a relatively mild inflation distorts the structure of production. It leads to the overexpansion of some industries at the expense of others. This involves a misapplication and waste of capital. When the inflation collapses, or is brought to a halt, the misdirected capital investment—whether in the form of machines, factories or office buildings—cannot yield an adequate return and loses the greater part of its value.Nor is it possible to bring inflation to a smooth and gentle stop, and so avert a subsequent depression.” – Henry Hazlitt – Economics in One Lesson

Inflation is the opium of the masses. The establishment’s interest in dumbing down the masses through government controlled public school indoctrination couldn’t be clearer than examining the chart below. The average non-thinking, math challenged, iGadget distracted, media controlled pawn thinks their household income has risen by $6,000 since 2008 because they have no understanding of Fed created inflation.

Even using the ridiculously downward manipulated CPI concoction shows the median household has lost ground. While median income has remained stagnant since 2000, the CPI is up 44%. Using honest inflation numbers would likely double that figure. Stagnant incomes with living costs 40% to 80% higher doesn’t exactly match the rhetoric of a strong economy being propagandized by the Deep State and their fake news media outlets.

To continue reading: What the Hell is Going On? (Part Two)

Advertisements

Barack Obama Is Now The Only President In History To Never Have A Year Of 3% GDP Growth, by Tyler Durden

Average growth during Obama’s two terms was 1.48 percent. If inflation was understated by 1.48 percent, there was no real growth during that time. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Following today’s extremely disappointing US GDP growth data, we have the final nail in the coffin of President Obama’s economic reign. Not only is the average annual growth rate of just 1.48% during Obama’s business cycle the weakest of any expansion since at least 1949, he has just become the only President to have not had even one year of 3% GDP growth.

An average annual GDP growth of 1.48% during Obama’s two terms…

As a reminder to a few blinkered media types, this means President Obama’s “recovery” has officially been the worst recovery in US history (despite adding almost $10 trillion to the national debt)…

And worse still, Barack Obama is the only president in US history to never have a year of economic growth over 3.0%…

As we noted previously, every other president in American history, even the really bad ones, had at least one year when U.S. GDP grew by at least 3 percent. But this has not happened under Obama even though he has had two terms in the White House.

As a reminder, this dismal economic track record came at the same as President Obama almost doubled the National Debt…

When ‘fake news’ and ‘peddling fiction’ meet ‘alternative facts’.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-01-27/barack-obama-now-only-president-history-never-have-year-3-gdp-growth

Back Below “Stall Speed”: 2016 Economy Matches Worst Year since Great Recession, by Wolf Richter

The economy is loaded with too much debt to achieve much in the way of growth. Is it even really growth when the overall debt load is growing faster than the economy? From Wolf Richter at wolfstreet.com:

Gutted Hopes for a Strong Finish.

The consensus forecast by economists predicted that the US economy would grow at an rate of 2.2% in the fourth quarter, as measured by inflation-adjusted GDP. The forecasts ranged from 1.5% to 2.8%. The New York Fed’s “Nowcast” pegged it at 2.1%, and the Atlanta Fed’s “GDPNow” at 2.9%. And today, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that growth in the fourth quarter was a measly 1.9%.

That was down from 3.5% in the third quarter, a spurt that had once again given rise to the now gutted hopes that the US economy would finally emerge from its stall speed. But instead it has slowed down.

For the year 2016, the growth rate dropped to 1.6%. It was worse even than 2013, when GDP growth tottered along at 1.7%. And it matched the growth rate in 2011. Both 2016 and 2011 were the worst since 2009 when the US was in the middle of the Great Recession:

In fact, over the past 50 years, anytime the economy grew less than 2% in a year, it was either already in a recession for part of the year, or there’d be a recession the following year. Hence “stall speed” – a speed that is too slow to keep the economy from stalling altogether.

To continue reading: Back Below “Stall Speed”: 2016 Economy Matches Worst Year since Great Recession

State Tax Revenues Plunge In Q2, by Tyler Durden

Tax revenues generally don’t plunge year-over-year when the economy is doing well. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

The latest confirmation that the US economy continues to deteriorate comes not from the Federal Government but from state-level data, where year-over-year growth in state tax revenues slowed in the first quarter to its lowest rate since the second quarter of 2014, according to the latest data published yesterday by the Rockefeller Institute of Government. Worse, preliminary data for the second quarter show an outright decline in state tax collections relative to the second quarter of last year.

As SMRA notes, state tax collections were up 1.6%, year-over-year, in the first quarter, the smallest increase since the second quarter of 2014. After adjustment for inflation, revenues were up 0.4%. Personal income tax collections, which account for roughly 36% of total state revenue, increased 1.8% in the first quarter, down from 5.1% in the fourth quarter. Sales tax collections – the second largest source of state revenue – increased 2.4% in the first quarter, up from 2.0% in the first quarter.

Corporate tax receipts, which account for less than 5% of state revenues, were down sharply for the second consecutive quarter, while motor fuel taxes, which also account for just under 5% of revenues, were up 2.0%, down from 3.5% increase in the fourth quarter.

According to preliminary estimates from Rockefeller, tax collections will be down 2.1% in the second quarter relative to last year, reflecting a decline of 3.3% in personal income taxes and a 9.2% plunge in corporate tax collections.

Sales tax revenue is estimated to have increased.

Rockefeller attributes the recent softness in personal income tax collections to a variety of factors, including weakness in the stock market, in both 2015 and the earlier part of this year, which has depressed tax collections related to investment income. Tax collections have been particularly weak in states with economies that are heavily reliant on oil or other natural resources. In the second quarter, growth in individual income taxes from withholding has slowed considerably.

The suddenly plunge in state income tax should not come as a surprise: the trend in individual income taxes at the state level in recent quarters tracks the sharp decline we have reported previously at the federal level.

For most states, the second quarter marks the end of the fiscal year and the current fiscal year began on July 1. According to Rockefeller, most states forecast weak income and sales tax growth for fiscal 2017. Also, in many states 2017 budget projections were prepared before the second quarter and don’t yet reflect the downside surprise in April tax receipts. In the words of the analysts at the Rockefeller Institute the outlook for state budgets in the 2016-2017 fiscal year “remains gloomy.”

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-24/state-tax-revenues-plunge-q2

Why MainStreet Isn’t Buying Obama’s Economic Recovery Fantasy, by Lance Roberts

You don’t need a Harvard economics PhD to know the state of the economy, and in fact, if you are so credentialed, you probably don’t know the state of the economy. From Lance Roberts at davidstockmanscontracorner.com:

Last night, President Obama took the stage at the Democratic National Convention to throw his support to Hillary Clinton in her bid for the Presidency. He also took the opportunity to take a victory lap for his economic achievements while in office.

With the 2016 Presidential Election fast approaching, this was one of the final chances the President will have to try and divert attention away from Hillary’s “trustworthiness” problem following continued revelations surrounding Benghazi, email scandals and the Clinton Foundation which is now under investigation by the IRS.

The problem for the Democrats currently, following a rather severe beating at the polls during the 2012 mid-terms, is the broad loss of faith in “hope and change.” With Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton virtually tied in the majority of polls (within a margin of error), it is imperative to regain those voters. Not surprisingly, since voters tend to “vote their pocketbook,” it wasn’t surprising to hear the President spin a decisively positive economic picture during his speech. He hopes that by pointing to falling unemployment rates, economic growth and higher confidence levels; it will give voters a sense of confidence in the President’s accomplishments and be convinced the expect the same for Hillary.

The question is whether the majority of the voting public will agree with the President’s message? Let’s take a look at some charts.

Government Debt

Since 2009, Government debt has surged by $7.8 Trillion and by the end of the next budget cycle will likely surpass $20 Trillion in total. The problem is that during the current Presidential term, real economic growth has risen by just $2.09 Trillion. However, even this number is inaccurate as the current government debt levels do not include other liabilities of the government such as social security and other social welfare programs.

The following chart quantifies it a bit better when you look at cumulative increases in debt and real, inflation adjusted, GDP.

Yes, the economy is growing, however, that growth has come at a huge cost of a debt burden that will be amplified if borrowing costs rise with anticipated increases in real interest rates. Of course, this is entirely ironic considering it was President Obama himself who admonished the previous administration’s increase in debt which he conveniently forgot to mention during his self-congratulatory speech.

The problem is this. There is a direct correlation between the expansion of debt and economic growth. Debt detracts revenue from productive investments that lead to economic growth and diverts it into non-productive interest payments. This is why the explosion in the amount of debt required to generate economic growth (currently $3.72) is unsustainable longer term.

To continue reading: Why MainStreet Isn’t Buying Obama’s Economic Recovery Fantasy

 

How the Fed Stopped the “Corporate Profit Recession” (and the Media Fell for it), by Wolf Richter

The corporate profits recession that afflicted the US economy is over because…because…because the 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks made more money! There’s no keeping a great economy down! From Wolf Richter at wolfstreet.com:

This about sums up the US economy in more than one way.

The end of the corporate “profit recession” has been declared last week. It was based on data by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, released on May 27. Corporate profits, after declining with some zigs and zags since their peak in the third quarter 2014, suddenly ticked up in the first quarter 2016. And everyone was ecstatic.

Corporate profits are in the eye of the beholder. For example, “adjusted earnings” – the ex-bad items earnings proffered by companies and analysts – of the S&P 500 companies have dropped four quarters in a row, since their peak in Q2 2015, on a year-over-year basis.

But by BEA’s estimates, one of the broadest measures out there, corporate profits peaked in Q3 2014. The BEA tracks “profits from current production” based on all US corporate entities. It makes a number of adjustments, including the Inventory Valuation Adjustment and the Capital Consumption Adjustment. It thus produces a seasonally adjusted annual rate for each quarter that then can be compared to prior quarters. This annualized rate shows what profits would be like at this rate for the entire year.

By this measure, corporate profits peaked at $1.643 trillion annualized rate in Q3 2014. By Q4 2015, profits had plunged 16% to $1.380 trillion. That’s the “corporate profit recession.” But then there was a tiny uptick of $8.1 billion in Q1 this year, which has been heralded as the long-awaited end of the profit recession.

Note the circled uptick in profits that was used by the media to proclaim the end of the profit recession, and how the overall profit picture since Q1 2012 smacks of stagnation, or worse:

But there’s a detail – a huge detail – that the media conveniently forgot to point out: whose profits are included in “corporate profits.” The BEA tells us (emphasis added):

These organizations consist of all entities required to file federal corporate tax returns, including mutual financial institutions and cooperatives subject to federal income tax; nonprofit organizations that primarily serve business; Federal Reserve banks; and federally sponsored credit agencies.

Ah yes, the Federal Reserve Banks (FRB), which include the 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks, such as the New York Fed. They’re private banks, owned by the largest financial institutions in their respective districts. And as private banks, their consolidated profits are added to US financial sector profits, and thus overall corporate profits, along with those from Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, and your local bank down the street.

It works like this: the Fed creates money out of thin air, buys securities with that money, adds the interest payments from those securities to “Net Income,” then pays most of it back to the Treasury, whose interest payments became part of this income in the first place. If this seems a bit absurd and circular, so be it. We’re interested in another absurdity here.

To continue reading: How the Fed Stopped the “Corporate Profit Recession” (and the Media Fell for it)

He Said That? 5/30/16

How government statistics work. From Winston Churchill (1874-1965) British politician and statesman, as cited in The Life of Politics. Henry Fairlie (1968):

I gather, young man, that you wish to be a Member of Parliament. The first lesson that you must learn is that, when I call for statistics about the rate of infant mortality, what I want is proof that fewer babies died when I was Prime Minister than when anyone else was Prime Minister. That is a political statistic.