Tag Archives: lies

Truth Is What We Hide, Self-Serving Cover Stories Are What We Sell, by Charles Hugh Smith

Most sentient people expect to be lied to, repeatedly, during the course of a single day, and they are seldom disappointed. From Charles Hugh Smith at oftwominds.com:

The fact that lies and cover stories are now the official norm only makes us love our servitude with greater devotion.

We can summarize the current era in one sentence: truth is what we hide, self-serving cover stories are what we sell.Jean-Claude Juncker’s famous quote captures the essence of the era: “When it becomes serious, you have to lie.”

And when does it become serious? When the hidden facts of the matter might be revealed to the general public. Given the regularity of vast troves of well-hidden data being made public by whistleblowers and white-hat hackers, it’s basically serious all the time now, and hence the official default everywhere is:truth is what we hide, self-serving cover stories are what we sell.

The self-serving cover stories always tout the nobility of the elite issuing the PR: we in the Federal Reserve saved civilization by saving the Too Big To Fail Banks (barf); we in the corporate media do investigative reporting without bias (barf); we in central government only lie to protect you from unpleasant realities–it’s for your own good (barf); we in the NSA, CIA and FBI only lie because it’s our job to lie, and so on.

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The Deadliest Operation, by Robert Gore

Choose your battles wisely.

One month to the day after President Kennedy’s assassination, the Washington Post published an article by former president Harry Truman.

I think it has become necessary to take another look at the purpose and operations of our Central Intelligence Agency—CIA. At least, I would like to submit here the original reason why I thought it necessary to organize this Agency during my Administration, what I expected it to do and how it was to operate as an arm of the President.

Truman had envisioned the CIA as an impartial information and intelligence collector from “every available source.”

But their collective information reached the President all too frequently in conflicting conclusions. At times, the intelligence reports tended to be slanted to conform to established positions of a given department. This becomes confusing and what’s worse, such intelligence is of little use to a President in reaching the right decisions.

Therefore, I decided to set up a special organization charged with the collection of all intelligence reports from every available source, and to have those reports reach me as President without department “treatment” or interpretations.

I wanted and needed the information in its “natural raw” state and in as comprehensive a volume as it was practical for me to make full use of it. But the most important thing about this move was to guard against the chance of intelligence being used to influence or to lead the President into unwise decisions—and I thought it was necessary that the President do his own thinking and evaluating.

Truman found, to his dismay, that the CIA had ranged far afield.

For some time I have been disturbed by the way CIA has been diverted from its original assignment. It has become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the Government. This has led to trouble and may have compounded our difficulties in several explosive areas.

I never had any thought that when I set up the CIA that it would be injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. Some of the complications and embarrassment I think we have experienced are in part attributable to the fact that this quiet intelligence arm of the President has been so removed from its intended role that it is being interpreted as a symbol of sinister and mysterious foreign intrigue—and a subject for cold war enemy propaganda.

The article appeared in the Washington Post’s morning edition, but not the evening edition.

Truman reveals two naive assumptions. He thought a government agency could be apolitical and objective. Further, he believed the CIA’s role could be limited to information gathering and analysis, eschewing “cloak and dagger operations.” The timing and tone of the letter may have been hints that Truman thought the CIA was involved in Kennedy’s assassination. If he did, he also realized an ex-president couldn’t state his suspicions without troublesome consequences.

Even the man who signed the CIA into law had to stay in the shadows, the CIA’s preferred operating venue. The CIA had become the exact opposite of what Truman envisioned and what its enabling legislation specified. Within a few years after its inauguration in 1947, it was neck-deep in global cloak and dagger and pushing agenda-driven, slanted information and outright disinformation not just within the government, but through the media to the American people.

The CIA lies with astonishing proficiency. It has made an art form of “plausible deniability.” Like glimpsing an octopus in murky waters, you know it’s there, but it shoots enough black ink to obscure its movements. Murk and black ink make it impossible for anyone on the outside to determine exactly what it does or has done. Insiders, even the director, are often kept in the dark.

For those on the trail of CIA and the other intelligence agencies’ lies and skullduggery, the agencies give ground glacially and only when they have to. What concessions they make often embody multiple layers of back-up lies. It can take years for an official admission—the CIA didn’t officially confess its involvement in the 1953 coup that deposed Iranian leader Mohammad Mosaddeq until 2013—and even then details are usually not forthcoming. Many of the so-called exposés of the intelligence agencies are in effect spook-written for propaganda or damage control.

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The Real Reason Why We’re So Crazy and Miserable All the Time, by Caitlin Johnstone

Maybe we’re not the crazy ones. From Caitlin Johnstone at theantimedia.org:

We are surrounded by screens full of voices that are always lying to us, and experts wonder why we’re so crazy and miserable all the time.

The screens tell us, “This is a perfectly normal and sane way of doing things. It is perfectly normal and sane to strip the earth bare and poison the air and the water in an economic system which requires infinite growth on a finite planet. People who say otherwise are raving lunatics!” And the social engineers wonder why there’s increasing disaffection and alienation among the populace.

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Fool me once, shame on Elon. Fool me twice. . . by Simon Black

How many lies will Elon Musk be allowed to tell before his adoring shareholders turn on him? From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

There’s no doubt you know the story…

On August 7, in the middle of the trading day, Tesla founder Elon Musk surprised investors with a tweet saying he was considering taking Tesla private at $420 per share (a $72 billion valuation) with “funding secured.” He quickly followed up with “Investor support is confirmed.”

Shares of Tesla soared 13% to $387 on the cryptic social media update from Tesla’s exalted chief.

The news created a media frenzy around the already red-hot company (and prompted the SEC to investigate Musk and Tesla for potentially lying to investors about a takeover). A single tweet – while the market was still open, no less – was an odd and informal way to announce such a major event.

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Did Musk consult Tesla’s board of directors before making this public? Did they even know of his plans to take the company private? Is any of this even true?

It didn’t matter to Tesla’s shareholders, who believe Musk walks on water and his tweets are gospel. So the stock price soared.

And the deal made sense for Musk…

Investors, including himself, would make a fortune.

And he would no longer be bothered by those pesky short sellers, reporting enormous losses to the public and nagging production deadlines (which Tesla continually misses)…

As a private company, Musk wouldn’t even have to ask shareholders’ permission for a $50 billion pay package.

Only, Tesla isn’t going private.

Last Friday, in a blog post (you know the announcement has got to be important if it’s escalated to blog post formality) Musk announced Tesla would stay public.

He gave a bunch of excuses for the decision, including going private would be more time consuming than he realized and that his beloved retail shareholders (his congregation) couldn’t own shares in a private company.

To continue reading: Fool me once, shame on Elon. Fool me twice. . .

Truth & Bullshit in the Digital Advertising Age, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Truth usually wins in the end, but it has to fight its share of epic battles. From Doug “Uncola” Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

In sales and advertising it’s always a numbers game.  That is to say the more people are impressed upon with a certain pitch, or spiel as it were, the larger the response will be during any given campaign or promotional event.

In advertising, “points” measure percentages of given populations and can be targeted to select demographics (called Target Rating Points) or even subjective measurements (called Index Rating Points) like the propensity to purchase in any given market.

Furthermore “Gross Impressions” quantify the approximate number and cost per thousands of duplicate people reached within a certain demographic; whereas “Reach” and “Frequency” represent math equations based upon algorithms involving unduplicated people impressed upon within a certain demographic and how many times they were imprinted with any given ad or message.

The points are these:  There is a mathematical science behind motivatingpeople located in markets (i.e. regions) into action; and this is why companies like Nike and Pepsi will pay hundreds of millions of dollars annually to athletes and movie stars alike to promote their products.  It is because advertising works.

Now let’s compare companies and strategies.

Suppose there was a monopolistic international entity by the name of Military Industrial Company Incorporated (MICI) selling a product called “Bullshit” and competing against an aggressive start-up by the name of Wild Web Worldwide (WWW) who had a better product trademarked under the name of “Truth”.

Obviously, Truth was the superior commodity, but MICI did not own the rights.  Therefore, MICI knew its Bullshit couldn’t compete with Truth on a direct basis, so it would have to utilize its superior assets to advertise Bullshit to the masses while, at the same time, suppressing WWW’s ability to deliver Truth to the people throughout various regions; specifically, within the United States Designated Market Area (DMA).

Unfortunately for WWW, MICI also owned the world’s premier advertising agency called The Mainstream Media International (TMMI).  Now TMMI was definitely not a typical advertising agency.  Not at all.  What made TMMI so special was that it actually owned 90% of the television stations, newspapers, and radio networks throughout the entire United States DMA.

Of course, this presented a problem for those working over at WWW because they knew they could never compete in delivering Truth to the people against the powerful Military Industrial Company Incorporated (MICI); especially given The Mainstream Media International’s (TMMI) near-monopoly on advertising, and selling, Bullshit.

To continue reading: Truth & Bullshit in the Digital Advertising Age

WSJ Asks Why We Should Keep Listening To James Clapper’s “Disinformation Campaign”, by Holman Jenkins

A lot of what comes out of James Clapper’s mouth is claptrap, or clappertrap. From Holman Jenkins at the Wall Street Journal via zerohedge.com:

Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper – a central figure in the “Russiagate” spy scandal, has earned quite the reputation for various misstatements, lies and even perjury.

Clapper appeared before the Senate to discuss surveillance programs in the midst of a controversy over warrantless surveillance of the American public. He was asked directly, “Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions, or hundreds of millions of Americans?”

There was no ambiguity or confusion and Clapper responded, “No, sir. … Not wittingly.” That was a lie and Clapper knew it when he said it. -John Turley

Since the 2016 election, Clapper has landed a job as a paid CNN commentator while peddling a new book, Facts and Fears – all while trying to shift the narrative on the FBI spying on the Trump campaign and pushing unfounded Russian conspiracy theories.

To that end, the Wall Street Journals Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. asks: Why does a former intelligence chief make claims he can’t back up?

Clapper Disinformation Campaign

James Clapper, President Obama’s director of national intelligence, gained a reputation among liberals as a liar for covering up the existence of secret data-collection programs.

Since becoming a private citizen, he has claimed that President Trump is a Russian “asset” and that Vladimir Putin is his “case officer,” then when pressed said he was speaking “figuratively.”

His latest assertion, in a book and interviews, that Mr. Putin elected Mr. Trump is based on non-reasoning that effectively puts defenders of U.S. democracy in a position of having to prove a negative. “It just exceeds logic and credulity that they didn’t affect the election,” he told PBS.

Mr. Clapper not only exaggerates Russia’s efforts, he crucially overlooks the fact that it’s the net effect that matters. Allegations and insinuations of Russian meddling clearly cost Mr. Trump some sizeable number of votes. Hillary Clinton made good use of this mallet, as would be clearer now if she had also made good use of her other assets to contest those states where the election would actually be decided.

To continue reading: WSJ Asks Why We Should Keep Listening To James Clapper’s “Disinformation Campaign”

Questions of a Stranger in a Brave New World, by Doug “Uncola” Lynn

Doug “Uncola” Lynn tries to dig through the humungous mountain of pure crap that is today’s intellectual millieu. From Lynn at theburningplatform.com:

The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left.

– Ecclesiastes 10:2

 For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. They will turn their ears away from the truth and turn aside to myths.

– 2 Timothy 4:3-4

Today, I read an exercise in surreality entitled:  ”Yes, This Is Going To Be Worse Than Watergate”.  When I first clicked the link, which was posted on Drudge this morning, I thought it was about the forthcoming Inspector General’s report and was hoping it might shed some light on FBI, DoJ, and State Department corruption at the highest levels.  Instead, the article rendered liberal outrage at the possibility of the Evil Trump firing the noble and honorable Robert Mueller.  The author, furthermore, claimed such a travesty would be a larger scandal than Watergate and lamented how not enough Republicans will join the high-minded, justice-seeking Democrats to save America.

Unbelievable.

The article even cites a vituperative Tweet to Trump from former CIA Director, leaker, and likely perjurer, John Brennan:

When the full extent of your venality, moral turpitude, and political corruption becomes known, you will take your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history. You may scapegoat Andy McCabe, but you will not destroy America…America will triumph over you.

    — John O. Brennan (@JohnBrennan) March 17, 2018

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.  One can only hope the Inspector General, Michael Horowitz, will soon make these fools look even more stupid.  Even still, when actual crimes that are truly bigger than Watergate are completely revealed, will liberal journalists and corrupt former spies plead for the Democrats in Congress to rally and save the country?  Nope.  It’s all just big fat nothingburgers to them.

To continue reading: Questions of a Stranger in a Brave New World