Tag Archives: Covid-19 consequences

2020: The Year We Lost Our Common Sense, Courage and Civil Liberties, by Robert Bridge

This year has been marked by off-the-charts duplicity, cowardice, and idiocy. From Robert Bridge at strategic-culture.org:

Once it became clear to the Western elite that their subjects would readily accept draconian anti-Covid measures, it encouraged them to usher in a code-red lifestyle where there will be no ‘return to normal’ in the foreseeable future and, possibly, never.

If nothing else, nobody can say we were not warned about the madness that would descend upon leap year 2020, making it one of the worst 366 days ever recorded on the Gregorian calendar.

On October 18, 2019, the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, together with the World Economic Forum and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation hosted the incredibly visionary Event 201, an exercise that simulated the outbreak of a pandemic “transmitted from bats to people that eventually becomes…transmissible from person to person.”

The simulation proved to be so uncannily similar to the real thing that started just three months later – from imagining a dramatic drop in air travel and business, to breaks in the global supply chain – that Johns Hopkins eventually felt compelled to release a statement saying their exercise was not intended to be a prophecy of future events.

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2020: The Year we Lost the Plot, by Rob Slane

The year 2020 may set an all time low for mass mental acuity. From Rob Slane at theblogmire.com:

This piece is the first in a series of five articles I will be publishing over the next couple of weeks looking at various aspects of our new Covidian State in 2020. These pieces are also due to be published on The Conservative Woman website from 27-31 December.


“Our Government, along with Governments around the world will shortly announce the quarantining of whole populations for a seasonal respiratory virus which leaves 99.8-99.9% of those who get it in the land of the living. What is more, they will also announce a shutdown of the entire economy for months and then, when the epidemic has actually gone, will mandate that you cover the lower half of your face with a bit of cloth. They will do this by frightening people into compliance with a barrage of propaganda, slogans, data entirely taken out of context, and the threat of massive fines.”

Anyone making this claim at the beginning of the year would rightly have been thought to have mislaid the plot and their marbles, long ago. But here we are, at the end of that same year, and it is precisely what has happened.

Only it is much worse than that.

Had you somehow been persuaded to give credence to this insane prophecy, you would probably have been comforted by the following thought: “They’ll never get away with it. The people will never stand for it.”

Not a bit of it. Somehow, millions of people across the country, and in fact across the world, were persuaded to accept it. By far the majority somehow thought that quarantining whole nations of healthy people for a virus, for the first time in history, was a good idea. Well, actually the second time in history to be precise. It was tried in 2009 by the Mexican Government during the Swine Flu outbreak, but they had the good sense to end it after a couple of weeks after realising how much it would devastate the country.

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COVID-19 Destroys the Weakest and Poorest, by Joseph Mercola

The headline would be more accurate if it said that Covid-19 measures destroy the weakest and poorest. From Joseph Mercola at lewrockwell.com:

COVID-19 has been called the great equalizer, but nothing could be further from the truth. The disease clearly affects certain groups far worse than others, and the countermeasures implemented to quell the outbreak have been a phenomenal boon for wealthy globalists while decimating the livelihood, and perhaps even the will to live, of the average person. As reported by IPS News:1

“According to the latest ILO reports,2 as job losses escalate due to lockdowns, nearly half of the global workforce is at risk of losing livelihoods, access to food and the ability to survive.

The World Economic Forum states that ‘With some 2.6 billion people around the world in some kind of lockdown, we are conducting arguably the largest psychological experiment ever.’3

As governments and corporations tighten political authoritarianism4 and technological surveillance, curtailing privacy and democratic protest, much of humanity is succumbing to anxiety, depression and a sense of powerlessness.”

Pandemics Highlight Pre-Existing Health Inequalities

An ever-growing number of doctors, academics and scientists are now questioning the origin of the virus, the validity of using PCR tests to diagnose “cases,” the usefulness of face masks, the questionable classification of COVID-19 deaths, the suppression of scientifically verified methods of prevention and treatment, and the safety and usefulness of COVID-19 vaccines.

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Can 20 Years of Deflation Be Compressed into Two Years? We’re About to Find Out, by Charles Hugh Smith

Things always look best at the top. From Charles Hugh Smith at oftwominds.com:

Extremes become more extreme right up until they reverse, a reversal no one believes possible here in the waning days of 2020.

The absolutely last thing anyone expects is a collapse of all the asset bubbles, i.e. a deflation of assets that reverses the full 20 years of bubble-utopia since 2000. The consensus is universal: assets will continue to loft ever higher, forever and ever, because the Fed has our back, i.e. central banks will create trillions out of thin air without any consequence other than assets lofting ever higher.

This research paper from the San Francisco Federal Reserve begs to differ. Here is an excerpt from Longer-Run Economic Consequences of Pandemics (San Francisco Federal Reserve)

“Measured by deviations in a benchmark economic statistic, the real natural rate of interest, these responses indicate that pandemics are followed by sustained periods–over multiple decades–with depressed investment opportunities, possibly due to excess capital per unit of surviving labor, and/or heightened desires to save, possibly due to an increase in precautionary saving or a rebuilding of depleted wealth. Either way, if the trends play out similarly in the wake of COVID-19 then the global economic trajectory will be very different than was expected only a few months ago.”

Allow me to translate: wars launch 20-year booms of rebuilding, pandemics launch 20 years of deflation. Oops! Not only do wars destroy physical assets that must be rebuilt, they also tend to kill off a consequential percentage of the labor force, generating a labor shortage that pushes up wages.

So capital wins funding the rebuilding and labor wins because workers are scarce and in demand: win-win baby! Pandemics are considerably less warm and fuzzy, especially Covid-19. Pandemics are like neutron bombs, they leave the built environment intact so there’s no impetus to invest.

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What About The Economy? by the Zman

The legacy media won’t be able to ignore the economy for much longer. From the Zman at theburningplatform.com:

Depending upon your age, two standard items in the news for most of your life, if not all of it, have been economic data and the stock market. The economic stagnation starting in the late 1960’s lasting into the 1980’s made the economy the top priority on everyone’s mind. Every election, it was one of the top issues. In the 80’s, Baby Boomers got into the financial markets, so the stock market and your 401K became a strange proxy for general happiness.

Something that has gone unremarked during the Trump era has been the fact that these paramount issues have dropped in priority with the media. On the Left the only thing that has mattered is hating Donald Trump and white people. On the Right, the only thing that matters is the various internal battles over what it means to be on the Right and where Trump fits into it. No one has noticed that the stock market has just about doubled in value during his presidency, despite it all.

Many on this side of the great divide mock public concern for the economy, but that is often just a pose. A primary goal of any human society is the prosperity of the people, as that is the point of human organization. Humans came together in larger and larger groups, in part, because it increased material prosperity. Even the communists were primarily focused on material prosperity. Read the book Red Plenty and you will see that no one is more materialist than a communist.

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“We Hadn’t Really Thought Through the Economic Impacts” ~ Melinda Gates

Why can’t they eat cake? Marie Antionette wondered. From Jeffrey A. Tucker at aier.org:

In a wide-ranging interview in the New York Times, Melinda Gates made the following remarkable statement: “What did surprise us is we hadn’t really thought through the economic impacts.” A cynic might observe that one is disinclined to think much about matters than do not affect one personally.

It’s a maddening statement, to be sure, as if “economics” is somehow a peripheral concern to the rest of human life and public health. The larger context of the interview reveals the statement to be even more confused. She is somehow under the impression that it is the pandemic and not the lockdowns that are the cause of the economic devastation that includes perhaps 30% of restaurants going under, among many other terrible effects.

She doesn’t say that outright but, like many articles in the mainstream press over this year, she very carefully crafts her words to avoid the crucial subject of lockdowns as the primary cause of economic disaster. It’s possible that she actually believes this virus is what tanked the world economy on its own but that is a completely unsustainable proposition.

Further, her comments provide a perfect illustration of the core problem all along: most of the people who have been advocating lockdowns in fact have no actual experience in managing pandemics. To many of these, Covid-19 became their new playground to try out an unprecedented experiment in social and economic management: shutting down travel, businesses, schools, churches, and issuing stay-at-home orders that smack of totalitarian impositions.

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People going hungry = Record high stock prices, by Simon Black

How can the stock market be at record high when the economy sucks? Hint: think about central banks and fiat debt instruments. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

New York City is up 33% this year. St. Louis is up 66%. In Oregon it’s up 100%.

I’m not talking about real estate prices, local budget gaps, or even property tax rates.

These are the startling increases in the number of people across the country, and the world, who are in need of food.

Food banks across the Land of the Free are experiencing an enormous surge in demand from people looking to feed their families, many of whom are experiencing such economic hardship for the first time.

The director of a local food bank in western Massachusetts, for example, recently said, “I thought I had seen the worst during the Great Recession [of 2008-2009]. But what we have experienced since March due to COVID-19 has really overwhelmed us.”

I saw a video last week showing thousands of cars “stretching as far as the eye can see” in line to receive free food from a local food bank in my hometown of Dallas, Texas.

Similarly, Miami had a “massive food bank line stretched for two miles.”

You can see the same thing in big cities like New York and LA, to quieter towns like Erie, Pennsylvania, and across the world.

In the small county of Dorset in southwestern England, food banks have handed out an astonishing 1.2 million meals over the past few months, shattering all previous records. And local officials say that was just the tip of the iceberg.

It’s obvious there are millions upon millions of people who are suffering immeasurably because of Covid lockdowns.

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Cost of Lockdowns: A Preliminary Report, by AIER staff

A long and frightening list of the costs of the lockdowns, from the AIER staff at aier.org:

In the debate over coronavirus policy, there has been far too little focus on the costs of lockdowns. It’s very common for the proponents of these interventions to write articles and large studies without even mentioning the downsides.

Here is a brief look at the cost of stringencies in the United States, and around the world, including stay-at-home orders, closings of business and schools, restrictions on gatherings, shutting of arts and sports, restrictions on medical services, and interventions in the freedom of movement.

Mental Health

Mental Health Data Source Region
During late June 2020, 40% of US adults reported to be struggling with mental health or substance abuse. CDC (June 2020) US
Of adults surveyed, 10.7% had thoughts of suicide compared to 4.3% in 2018. CDC (August 2020) US
Reported symptoms of anxiety were three times higher than they were in Q2 2019 and reported symptoms of depression were four times higher than they were in Q2 2019. CDC (August 2020) US
Of individuals aged 18-24, 25.5% considered suicide. CDC (August 2020) US
In New York alone, Google searches increased for phrases and words: anxiety, panic attack, and insomnia. JAMA (October 2020) New York
Between April and October, the portion of emergency visits related to mental health for children (5-11) increased by 24% and 31% for 12-17 year olds compared to 2019. CDC (November 2020) US
In late June, 13% of survey respondents said they had started or increased substance use to cope with the pandemic. CDC (August 2020) US
More than 40 states have reported increases in opioid-related mortality. AMA (October 2020) US
From January 2020 to March 2020, 19,416 people died from drug overdoses, which is 3,000 more than in 2019 of the same quarter. CDC (2020) US

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UK Health Study Found 26,000 “Extra” Non-COVID Deaths At Home Amid Lockdowns, by Tyler Durden

26,000 extra deaths and throw in unemployment and economic deterioration and in the UK, as in the US, the cure is far worse than the disease. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

BBC recently reported some shocking statistics regarding UK health, but which will perhaps come as no surprise to those critics who warned that far-reaching national lockdowns would cause other unseen adverse effects:

Compared with normal years, there have been more deaths at home from a number of major causes, including cancers and respiratory diseases, during the last six months.

The latest analysis published by Britain’s Office for National Statistics found that more than 26,000 “extra” deaths occurred in private homes this year, while simultaneously hospital deaths have been lower than usual.

“More men than normal are dying at home from heart disease in England and Wales, and more women are dying from dementia and Alzheimer’s, figures show,” the report says.

File image via DW/Picture-Alliance

The figures had been issued just ahead of European officials in Germany, France, and Italy contemplating ‘severe’ extended measures that could last as long as four to five months, as Germany is now said to be mulling.

The BBC report further cited Alzheimer’s charity groups as lamenting the “heartbreaking” and devastating hidden adverse impact of both stay-at-home orders and social distancing measures, particularly on elderly men.

Deaths attributable to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at home are on a major upward trajectory while being down in hospitals, strongly suggesting that more people with life-threatening but treatable diseases are simply avoiding professional medical services for fear of COVID-19 or possibly on fear of violating social distancing measures or travel bans.

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Lockdowns Haven’t Brought down Covid Mortality. But They Have Killed Millions of Jobs. By Mitch Nemeth

As predicted from the beginning of this fiasco by SLL and other commentators, the cure has been far worse than the disease. Especially the lockdown part of the cure. From Mitch Nemeth at mises.org:

killed job

During the early onset of covid-19 in the spring, government officials across the political spectrum widely agreed that government intervention and forced closure of many businesses was necessary to protect public health. This approach has clearly failed in the United States as it led to widespread economic devastation, including millions of jobs lost, bankruptcies, and extremely severe losses in profitability. Nor have states with strict lockdowns succeeded in bringing about fewer covid deaths per million than states that were less strict.

Consequently, a few months into the pandemic, some governors weighed the competing economic costs with covid-19 containment and slowly reopened their economies. Of course, these governors did not mandate businesses reopen; however, they provided businesses the option to reopen.

Hysteria ensued as many viewed easing restrictions as akin to mass murder. The Atlantic famously dubbed Georgia governor Brian Kemp’s easing of restrictions as “human sacrifice” and referred to Georgians as being in a “case study in pandemic exceptionalism.” Instead, we should view the lockdowns as a case study in the failure of heavy-handed approaches in containing a highly infectious virus.

Now that we are nine months into this pandemic, there is a clearer picture of how state government approaches varied widely. It is clear that “reopened” economies are faring much better overall than less “reopened” economies. “Fueled by broader, faster economic reopenings following the initial coronavirus rash, conservative-leaning red states are by and large far outpacing liberal-leaning blue states in terms of putting people back to work,” writes Carrie Sheffield. This follows logically especially when considering that human beings learn to adapt very quickly. Now, we have learned much more about treating this virus and about who is most at risk from infection.

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