Tag Archives: National Debt

Debt and Deficits: They’re Unsustainable, by Bob Luddy

There’s a certainty to increasing debt and compounding interest: eventually they must end. Either the debt is repaid or repudiated. From Bob Luddy at spectator.org:

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This problem is 10,000 times bigger than the border wall, by Simon Black

The cost of the proposed border wall is a rounding error in terms of total government spending or the US national debt. From Simon Black at sovereignman.com:

We are in the midst of the longest government shutdown in history.

Don’t get me wrong, I like having the government shut down. As I’ve said before, I believe it is my moral duty to pay as little taxes as possible.

The government does some really stupid things with your tax dollars. I’d rather not pay for a $2 billion Obamacare website that doesn’t work, or to defend Congressmen against sexual assault allegations.

So, by starving the beast, I at least ensure they’re not squandering my money.

But I think it’s ridiculous that this government posturing is financially crippling the 800,000 government workers (and millions of contractors) who are now out of work – or being forced to work without pay.

To be fair, last night the president signed a law guaranteeing they would be paid for past work – a month into this fiasco. It’s a step in the right direction, as there’s a word for forcing people to work without pay – slavery.

That’s why I offered to pay the rent of any government workers hurt by the shutdown. I am using my tax savings to bail out some of these government workers the feds left high and dry.

But at its core, this whole shutdown comes down to a disagreement over $5 billion. That is how much money Trump wants to build the border wall between the US and Mexico. And Congress refuses to fund it.

Granted, that’s a lot of money to you and me. And it should be a lot of money to the government, too.

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The American Dream is Being Held Hostage, by Virginia Fidler

The American Dream isn’t being held hostage, it’s been mortgaged. From Virginia Fidler at goldtelegraph.com:

For the first time in its history, the U.S. is seeing a budget deficit in excess of $1 trillion. And this deficit is expected to continue to grow. At a time when the U.S. economy is booming, the national debt is experiencing new heights, with no end in sight. A spiraling budget deficit will likely send inflation soaring. Never before has the U.S. deficit skidded out of control while the economy is in the midst of an upward swing. It is not a good sign.

President Trump favors tax cuts, while a large baby boomer generation is expecting its Medicare and Social Security benefits. Baby boomers started turning 65 in 2011, and the number of boomers retiring will grow to 35 million during the next three decades. The younger, working generation will only grow by 28 million, but will carry the burden of paying for the Social Security and health care benefits of the older generation. With boomers expected to live longer than previous generation, there will be a growing population expecting payments for a longer period of time. Social security and Medicare and other healthcare programs will are responsible for 100 percent increase in government spending with the exception of interest payment on the national debt. The burden of paying for these expenditures will fall on a generation that is seeing its American dream faltering before its eyes.

Are we facing a potential economic crisis?

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Merry Christmas from Uncle Sam — You Got More Debt! by Peter Schiff

Got $4,178.10 burning a hole in your pocket? Good, because the government increased your share of the national debt by that much from Christmas 2017 to Christmas 2018. From Peter Schiff at schiffgold.com:

Between Christmas 2017 and Christmas 2018, the US government added a staggering $1,370,760,684,441.54 to the national debt, according to Treasury Department figures.

If you split that up between all American, your share of Uncle Sam’s 2018 spending spree comes to about $4,178.10.

Merry Christmas!

You’re welcome.

CNSNews.com came up with that figure by dividing the Christmas-to-Christmas debt increase by the latest population estimate from the US Census Bureau (328,082,386). In order to pay off the increase in the national debt, each household would have to pony up $10,743. And when you consider that only 55% of American households pay income tax, that number climbs north of $19,500.

Of course, this doesn’t include all of the unfunded liabilities such as Social Security and Medicare. When you factor them in, the total national debt eclipses $200 trillion. That number is so big, it’s essentially meaningless.

So, what is Uncle Sam doing to address his debt problem?

Absolutely nothing.

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Debt, Death, and the US Empire, by Antonius Aquinas

Insolvency will sound the death knell for the American empire. Fron Antonius Aquinas at antoniosaquinas.com:

Deep State Operative John Bolton

In a talk which garnered little attention, one of the Deep State’s prime operatives, National Security Advisor John Bolton, cautioned of the enormous and escalating US debt.  Speaking before the Alexander Hamilton Society, Bolton warned that current US debt levels and public obligations posed an “economic threat” to the nation’s security:

It is a fact that when your national debt gets to the level ours is, that it constitutes an economic threat to the society.  And that kind of threat ultimately has a national security consequence for it.*

What was most surprising about Bolton’s talk was that there has been little reaction to it from the financial press, the markets themselves, or political commentators. While the equity markets have been in the midst of a sell off, it has not been due (as of yet) to US deficits, currently in excess of $1trillion annually.  Instead, the slide has been the result of fears over increase in interest rates and the continued trade tensions with China.

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The US Is Spending $1.5 Billion On Debt Interest Every Day, by Tyler Durden

That $1.5 billion a day figure, already exorbitant, is only going to go up. From Tyler Durden at zerohedge.com:

Several weeks ago, when looking at the US budget data for the recently concluded (Sept 30) Fiscal 2018, we noted that the most troubling observation in the latest data (besides the growing deficit, rising spending and shrinking tax revenues) was that the government paid $523 billion in total interest in fiscal 2018, the highest on record.

Alas, this is just the start, because to fund the fiscal stimulus that has already been enacted, US deficit spending is only set to soar higher, with the resulting interest expense rising above $600 billion in 2019.

But the truly scary nature of this number is in the context of all other G-7 nations: as the following chart from Deutsche Bank’s Torsten Slok reveals, spending on interest expense in the US is now just about $1.5 billion per day, which at current interest rates is orders of magnitude higher than what all other G-7 developed nations spend on interest.

That too is just the start: as Slok notes, “US government last year on average paid $1.5bn each day in interest payments, and this is rising toward $2bn per day over the coming years.

And that’s with rates still relatively low due to the maturity schedule of US debt, which however is only set to rise as existing debt issued over the past decade during record low rates matures and is replaced with debt yielding far more.

How long before this becomes the most politically sensitive economic topic, and how long before the president threatens to fire Powell unless he, too, starts monetizing the debt?

 

 

 

Investors Are Going to Get Scalped, by Bill Bonner

If the yield on the Treasury ten-year note goes up another percentage point, it will spell doom for the stock market. So says Bill Bonner at bonnerandpartners.com:

We spent a delightful, long Thanksgiving weekend in the country, entertaining children and grandchildren. Not once did we open our laptop computer or look at the headlines.

But now, it is another workweek, and we’re back on the job. As usual, we are looking at dots… and wondering how they got to be so goofy.

Particularly Moronic

This morning, for example, brings a particularly moronic news item from CNBC. The report tells us that the Dow has another 2,000 points left to drop before recovering:

More than half of the members of the CNBC Global CFO Council think the Dow Jones Industrial Average will fall below 23,000 – roughly 2,000 points from its current level – before the stock market barometer is ever able to top the 27,000 level. The 23,000 level would equate to another 8 percent in decline among the Dow group of stocks before the selling stops.

But hey… why stop there?

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